November is National Diabetes Awareness Month

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Diabetes is one of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States. It can cause blindness, nerve damage, kidney disease, and other health problems if it’s not controlled. One in 11 Americans have diabetes—that’s more than 29 million people.

People with prediabetes have levels of blood sugar that are higher than normal, but not high enough for them to be diagnosed with diabetes. People with prediabetes are more likely to get type 2 diabetes. About 84 million people in the United States have prediabetes, but most of them don’t know they have it. If you have prediabetes, you can take steps to reverse it and prevent or delay diabetes. It’s important to identify if you could be at risk for prediabetes or diabetes.

If you have a family health history of diabetes, this puts you at a high risk for developing prediabetes and diabetes. You are also more likely to get type 2 diabetes if you have had gestational diabetes, are overweight or obese, or if you are African American, American Indian, Asian American, Pacific Islander, or Hispanic.

Some of the signs of Diabetes commonly experienced include:

• Frequent urination

• Excessive thirst

• Increased hunger

• Weight loss

• Tiredness

• Lack of interest and concentration

• A tingling sensation or numbness in the hands or feet

Learning about your family health history of diabetes is an important step in finding out if you have prediabetes and knowing if you are more likely to get diabetes. Be sure to let your doctor know about your family health history of diabetes, especially if you have a mother, father, sister, or brother with diabetes. Your doctor might recommend that you have screening for diabetes. Even if you have a family health history of diabetes, you can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by eating healthier, being physically active, and maintaining or reaching a healthy weight. This is especially important if you have prediabetes, and taking these steps can reverse prediabetes. Ask your provider whether you need earlier screening for diabetes.

For additional information visit https://www.cdc.gov/features/family-history-diabetes/index.html or speak to one of our Disease Managers by calling 801-586-9705 or 801-586-9527